www.moviemags.com
THE SITE OF MOVIE MAGAZINES
Dedicated to movie related publications
Contains 7,804 magazines with 287,317 listed issues


MOVIE MAKER
The art & business of making movies.
General, Independent Magazine from United States


- First issue: 1993
- Independent films and moviemakers.
- Website: www.moviemaker.com

Last updated:
27 July 2019

Recent updates


Special thanks for this page goes to:
Garry Malvern
Scott Matheson

COVERS FOUND & MISSING
Info from the Database
Highslide JS Listing is complete.
There are 132 issues listed in the database

Info from the Cover Gallery
Covers found: 132
Covers missing: None
See The listing

CONTENTS: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 All GALLERIES: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 All

Issue 44
September/October/November 2001
Cover Story: Terry Gilliam by Elayne Taylor Eccentric genius, battler of accountants and studio heads, madman. Terry Gilliam has been called all kinds of things-and these are his friends talking. The Name of Action by Doug Atchison At a time of national crisis, the lessons in classic movies like Sergeant York may provide some answers-and solace. Remembering John Ford by Michael Tunison Those who worked with the late, great director know that his cantankerous temperament was as much a part of his legend as the enormous body of work he left behind. Aesthetics of the Digital Revolution by James Tocher Is DV delivering on its promise to demystify the moviemaking process-and allow professional production on a shoestring budget? Murder, Mayhem and John Dahl by Paula Schwartz The writer/director best known for his work in the film noir genre discusses his latest-and biggest-film to date, Joy Ride. The Most Underrated (and Underknown) Movies of the Last Decade by Jeremy Arnold Moviemakers have produced a few true gems in the past 10 years... unfortunately, you may not have heard of many of them. The Business of Laughter by Phillip Willaims For French writer/director Francis Veber, making comedies is a serious business. Here, the man behind The Dinner Game and La Cage Aux Folles talks about Le Placard (The Closet). MM Notebook Letters Home Cinema: Exploring the Horror Genre by Rus Thompson Festival Beat: American Short Shorts Cinevation: Interactive MovieMaking by Margi Szperling How They Did It: Out of the Black by Karl Kozak World Cinema: The Golden Ages of Korean Cinema by Lenny Smith Documentary: The Career of Albert Maysler by Travis Crawford Shorts: Rock Creek by Watne Baimbridge Profile: Kiyoshi Kurosawa by Andrew Hamlin Profile: Amy Robinson by Elayne Taylor Mixed Reviews Crossing The Line: Herman Sandler by Trudie Styler


Issue 43
June/July/August 2001
Mark & Michael Polish by Jennifer M. Wood They swept onto the indie moviemaking scene in 1999 with the ambitious and critically acclaimed Twin Falls Idaho. In their second feature, Jackpot, the always original Polish brothers explore the price of fame through the eyes of a wannabe country singer. We Got This Oscar Nomination... Now What? by Elayne Taylor In moviemaking, as in baseball, pitching is key. Just ask Gail Lerner and Colin Campbell who, even after receiving an Oscar nomination for their short film Seraglio, had to enlist the help of 'The Pitch King,' Bo Zenga. Hollywood's Money Man by Jeremy Arnold As president of Imperial Entertainment Group, Morgan Rector has helped finance 400 movies in 12 years. How can you get your feature to be next? Jennifer Jason Leigh Dances With the Dark by Elayne Taylor From her breakout performance in Fast Times at Ridgemont High to her current role as director and star of The Anniversary Party, Jennifer Jason Leigh has dared to go where few other actresses would. Indie-Friendly Digital Rental Houses by Frank McMahon Sometimes it just makes more sense to rent your equipment. Find out how some of the country's leading rental houses are helping independent moviemakers make their mark on the industry. What They Really Want to Do is Direct by Andy Rose Though they're best known for their roles in front of the camera, a surprising number of actors are suddenly turning to directing-and DV is their medium of choice. Larry Clark's Loss of Sexual Innocence by Travis Crawford If there's one thing director Larry Clark knows about, it's the lives of those on the fringes of society. In his latest movie, Bully, he revisits the theme of teenage sexuality and brutality-and again stirs up a cauldron of controversy in the process. The Making of Classic by Elana Starr Each year, only a fraction of the films ever made are designated for preservation. Which ones make the cut, and how can you make sure your favorite film goes down in history? BY The Ultimate Moviemaking Machine by Phillip Williams BMW's foray into film distribution may have been a surprise, but with such seminal directors as John Frankenheimer, Ang Lee and Guy Ritchie behind the wheel, film fans are racing to the nearest computer screen. Choosing the Best Film School by Gregg Rossen What makes one school great and another mediocre? Hint: It has nothing to do with an LA or NYC address Column & Departments MM Notebook Letters Home Cinema Jules Dassin's RiFiFi by Rus Thompson How They Did It Viva Las Nowhere by Jason Bloom Festival Beat Provincetown, First Glance Philadelphia, New York International Film and Video Exploring Czech Cinema by Radovan Holub Even during the toughest times under a Communist regime, Czech films always display a great deal of restraint when it comes to discussing the politics of their country. Documentary Barbara Kopple's My Generation by Jennifer M. Wood Profiles Barbet Schroeder by Philip Williams Crossing the Line Anthony Quinn by Brian O'Hare


Issue 42
March/April/May 2001
Cover Story: The Gentle Art of Seduction: A Conversation with Jean-Jacques Annaud by Phillip Williams With a slew of international successes, Jean-Jacques Annaud might just be the most famous director you don't know. Following the success of his high-profile Enemy at the Gates, all that may finally change. A Tale of Two Screenwriters by Doug Atchison and Joel B. Strunk At the world's most prestigious screenwriting competition, winning isn't everything. Here, a Nicholl Fellowship finalist and winner compare notes on their experiences. Behind the Backgrounds by Scott Essman Ever wondered what goes into creating those eye-popping backgrounds on big-budget features? Chances are good that the background you're admiring was created through digital technology. First Time's a Charm by Susan Kouguell Vera Blasi, Alan Sereboff and Stel Pavlou are three screenwriters who've scored big their first time out. Here, they reveal the secrets of their success. The Roger Corman School of Moviemaking by Beverly Gray From Jack Nicholson to John Sayles, Roger Corman has been mentoring young moviemakers throughout his career. Here, past 'students' talk about some of the lessons they've learned. It Came From Roger Corman by Andrew Hamlin For 45 years, his reign as the king of 'economic' indie moviemaking has gone unrivaled. At 75, Roger Corman is still going strong - churning out films as quickly (and cheaply) as possible. Why I Loved Filming In... by David Geffner There's more to North America than just New York, LA and Vancouver. Find out why moviemakers like John Waters, Frank Oz and Alexander Payne are choosing lesser-known locales. Shooting 24p Hi-Def by Andy Rose In plain language here are the pros and cons of shooting your next film in 24p Hi-Def. Time-tested Non-Digital Effects by John Gaspard & Dale Newton Learn to maximize the production value of your digital film with a few non-digital tricks. Wanye Wang's World by Paula Schwartz He's stuck to 'family values' in many past films, but director Wayne Wang pushes the envelope a bit with his erotic The Center of the World. Art of the Writer/Director by Jeremy Arnold Allison Anders, Christopher Nolan, James Gray and Jonathan Nossiter talk about the power and pressure of being a writer/director. New Ways to Sell Your Screenplay by Jeremy Arnold Tired of banging on doors and taking meetings that get your screenplay nowhere closer to 'sold?' The answer may be as close as the Internet. Copyright Protection in the Digital Age by Karen Holly & Susan Stroh Longtime script consultant Linda Seger says that the Internet offers plagiarists a wealth of opportunity. How can you safeguard your work? Column & Departments MM Notebook Letters Home Cinema by Rus Thompson John Boorman's Point Blank Ask Mr. Hollywood by Dov S-S Simens Festival Beat Sundance, Slamdance, Sarasota, Ft. Lauderdale. How They Did It by Jon Dichter The Operator Shorts by Jason Reitman gulp Documentary by Elayne Taylor Keep the River on Your Right Mixed Reviews Frame-By-Frame by Eric Sherman Crossing the Line by Phillip Williams Stanley Kramer, Jason Robards


Issue 41
Dec/January/February 2001
Cover Story: Julia Stiles by Timothy Rhys Three years ago Julia Stiles told us she'd really paid her dues in this business. She was 16. Now that she's all grown up and suddenly just about the hottest ticket in town, we sat down with her again for a little reality check Buzzfest: The Annual IFP Market by Carmen Ficarra You know it as the place where Clerks and The Brothers McMullen found distributors. The IFP Market has earned its reputation d its reputation as the place to go to break out of the pack. Age Old Questions by Carmen Ficarra Not every freshly minted moviemaker is 25, or even 35. How does the game differ for middle-aged dreamers. The Rise of the DVD Short by Andy Rose Short films have made a comeback, and plenty of companies now believe that the DVD may be the short film's best chance at long term survival. A Fresh Look at Super8 by Giles Musitano One of the world's leading Super8 pros makes a case for ditching your DV camera and switching to Super8 on the road to Hollywood success in 2001. Surviving Park City by David Geffner Is Sundance now too commercial, too politicized, too much media, too much of a film market, too, too, too... or is it more important to independents than ever? 10 Best Cities for Making Movies by George Wing From the expected to the unexpected, these are the top 10 places in North America to wage a career in moviemaking. Genre Jumping with Ang Lee by A.G. Basoli The very American Tawainese director changed his cinematic tune again with the high-flying Croucing Tiger, Hidden Dragon. What is he up to next? High and Low with Willem Dafoe by A.G. Basoli The actor's actor is back on top with a string of new movies. He talks candidly with us about his background, his art ound, his art and the importance of being useless. Scorsese in Roma by Adam Goldstein MM's Adam Goldstein is one of a chosen few: he's been on the set of Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York and witnessed the extraordinary transformation of Cinecitt? Studios in Rome into mid-19th century New York City. Inside MPAA by Doug Atchison The writer/producer/director of The Pornographer learns how the MPAA rates films and why indies seem to get strong-armed so often. The Future of Exhibition by Greg Melick More movies are being made today than ever before, so why are so many of the major theater chains closing down? On Location: New York by Adam Goldstein How do you ask 100 Spanish and Polish-speaking NYC residents to remove their air conditioners in the middle of a scorching summer? It's a day in the life of a New York City location manager. Roadmaps to the Digital Age by Glen Berry Book publishers never met a trend they didn't like. Several new volumes try to take the mystery out of the digital revolution. The Microcinema Movement by Joel Bachar & Taso Lagos The resurgence of microcinemas and 'underground' venues is a healthy sign for the movie industry. Or is it? Column & Departments MM Notebook Letters Home Cinema by Rus Thompson The Best and Worst of 2000 on Video. Shorts by Gregg Rossen Revenge of the Red Balloon. Festival Beat Montreal, Locarno, New York, Deep Ellum. Documentary by Carmen Ficarra 30 Frames a Second. Profile by Phillip Williams Eugenio Zanetti. Mixed Reviews Crossing the Line by Carmen Ficarra Richard Farnsworth

All magazine covers are copyrighted by their publishers. No rights are given or implied. They are presented here for their historical significance and the edification of magazine fans and collectors, everywhere.