SIGHT AND SOUND
aka "Sight & Sound"
General, Mainstream Monthly Magazine from London ,United Kingdom


- First issue: 1991
- General cinema.
- Took its present form in May 1991 with the incorporation of Monthly Film Bulletin. Prior to that it was published quarterly.
- Half the magazine contains great articles on various topics and the other half has the film reviews for the contemporary releases. I especially like the full synopsis given for every movie: No surprises when you 're watching The Crying Game for the first time.
- Published by the British Film Institute.
- Monthly, 70 colour pages in A4 format.
- Published by British Film Institute (BFI)
- Website: www.bfi.org.uk

Last updated:
2020-12-31

Recent updates


Special thanks for this page goes to:
Garry Malvern
Grace
Scott Matheson
Gary

COVERS FOUND & MISSING
Info from the Database
Highslide JS Listing is complete.
There are 352 issues listed in the database

Info from the Cover Gallery
Covers found: 352
Covers missing: None
See The listing

CONTENTS: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 All GALLERIES: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 All

Issue 152
December 2003
What a carve up!: Horror films endlessly devour and regurgitate characters and ideas. Mark Kerrnode asks what new versions of 1970s shockers The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and Alien might mean for today's audiences. Plus Kim New


Issue 151
November 2003
Play Madigan For Me: Clint Eastwood has returned to pre-Dirty Harry days to make a crime film that matches the best of his Westerns. Adrian Wootton dissects the moral universe of Mystic River.
Sex And


Issue 150
October 2003
Turning on a dime: As volume one of Kill Bill is released, Quentin Tarantino tells Mark Olsen how he gets his audience just where he wants them and why he makes movies in his head.
Darkness falls


Issue 149
September 2003
Eurocentric: Edinburgh 2003: From a festival with a 'New Europe' theme we feature Mike Hodges' thriller I'll Sleep When I'm Dead, a dark revenger's tragedy. The director talks to Stephen Chibnall about self-loathing and London


Issue 148
August 2003
Shock Around The Clock: The second series of 24 understands the fears that drove America to war in Iraq, claims David Thomson, as he re-imagines the show directed by David Lynch and Tarantino.
In The


Issue 147
July 2003
Thieves like us: Lars von Trier's Dogville was the talking point at this year's Cannes. On an exclusive visit to the set, Stig Bjorkman talked to the director and his star Nicole Kidman Plus our round-up of Cannes 2003.


Issue 146
June 2003
Sympathy for the devil: Max, a fictional account of Hitler's early days as a struggling artist, seeks to reveal the man behind the monster. Demetrios Matheou and Richard Black ask why other Hitler portraits resort to ridicule.


Issue 145
May 2003
Don't fence me in: Jack Nicholson gave 1970s cinema a new kind of leading man, and he's gone on making unpredictable choices ever since. But are his best roles those where he's least comfortable, asks Danny Leigh.


Issue 144
April 2003
Going down: Spike Lee's 25th Hour translates the fear and anxiety of its jail-bound anti-hero into a hymn to post-9/11 New York. By Amy Taubin.
Eastern Bloc: Berun 2003: Berlin 2003 played host


Issue 143
March 2003
Magnificent Obsession: With his new film Far from Heaven director Todd Haynes, like Fassbinder before him, has been inspired to new heights by Douglas Sirk's All That Heaven Allows. Plus Nick James discusses the Sirk style wit


Issue 142
February 2003
A Good place to die: A young Mexican's debut feature tackles love, death, redemption and cross-generational sex with skill and sensitivity. Demetrios Matheou talks to Carlos Reygadas about Japon.
Futu


Issue 141
January 2003
Odd Man Out: Director David Cronenberg and star Ralph Fiennes both identify with Spider, the shabby schizophrenic misfit at the heart of Cronenberg's new film. Kevin Jackson and Nick James find out why.